Phone: (405) 424-1699
As a proactive leader in our industry, we want to urge you to join us in the Domestic Energy Producers Alliance (DEPA).
 

About Us

The Domestic Energy Producers Alliance is a nationwide collaboration of 15 coalition associations – from California to West Virginia, Texas to Montana – representing about 10,000 individuals and companies engaged in domestic onshore oil and natural gas exploration and production (E&P). We believe in seeking common ground, and in common sense solutions to the challenges that face us in our businesses, including our relationship with the federal legislative and executive branches of government. In only its fifth year, DEPA now represents a majority of the individuals and companies responsible for the current renaissance in American oil and natural gas production.

Issues

  • Independents are not Big Oil

    More than 18,000 independent producers drill 95% of US oil and natural gas wells, and account for 67% of US production
  • Maintaining critical tax provisions

    The American public benefits from the tax provisions furnishing the capital to drill for the energy that all Americans need
  • Regulatory Common Sense

    As independent producers, royalty owners and our service industry partners, we are all united together – partisanship aside – to educate national decision-makers on who we are, what we do, and why the survival of the independent domestic energy industry is so vital to the nation’s economy

In The Spotlight

Lifting Export Restrictions on US Crude Oil

Washington, DC-based Brookings Institute published a new report September 9 in favor of lifting current US restrictions on the export of crude oil. The report [view] comes to the conclusion that discontinuing the export ban would help lower US gasoline prices for consumers, increase profits for producers and encourage more production on US soil - all of which are good for continued economic growth and productivity and American energy security.

DEPA BLOG
  • 17
    Feb

    OPEC no friend of America

    The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries doesn’t like Oklahoma. The worldwide oil cartel doesn’t care much for Texas or North Dakota either, or Ohio, Pennsylvania, California and New Mexico.

    Those states hold significant shale oil and natural gas reserves, and the increased production of American oil has jeopardized the economic well-being of the oil-producing countries that make up OPEC.

    Read More +

  • 11
    Feb

    Wrong decision on venue, but still the right fight

    Today we received some very disappointing news in our landmark Endangered Species Act lawsuit against the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Despite recent orders issued by the Northern District of Oklahoma and even the DC District Court declaring that Tulsa was the proper venue for DEPA’s lawsuit, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (MDL Panel) had the final word and issued a brief order ignoring the recent district court decisions and transferred our case to Washington DC. After nearly a year, our venue battle has ended. Our case now goes to the very same judge who rubber-stamped the secret settlements between FWS and two environmental groups in 2011.

    Read More +

  • 09
    Feb

    Unintended Consequences

    Removing the percentage depletion provision from the tax code would have unintended consequences for the nation’s economy by harming small businesses and royalty owners.

    Percentage depletion is a tax provision that allows oil and gas producers to recoup some of the costs of investing in energy production. It was designed as an incentive to keep existing wells producing and to invest in newer wells. However, President Barack Obama’s 2016 budget proposal includes the elimination of this provision.


    Read More +

  • 05
    Feb

    Working with leadership to lift the ban on exports

    Greetings from Washington, DC.

    We are here with DEPA's DC lobbying team working with the leadership of both political parties to find consensus on lifting the decades-old ban on exporting American crude oil and natural gas.

    The ban on exports is costing American energy and American jobs. It sits alongside the bad ideas of the Nixon-era price controls as a low point in American economic policy.

    Read More +